Keats "sighting"

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Keats "sighting"

Postby Malia » Sun Jan 22, 2006 2:38 am

I put "sighting" in quotes because I actually heard his name on the radio :) Anyway, for all of you out there who live in America and listen to National Public Radio (aka NPR), Keats played a "cameo" role in a skit on Garrison Keilor's A Prairie Home Companion today.

For those of you who haven't heard of the show, it's a radio show hosted by writer and storyteller Garrison Keilor and contains skits, muscial guests, etc. and is fairly popular here in the States.

The skit in which Keats was mentioned was about "Ruth Harrison: Reference Librarian". This is a satire about the career of reference librarian (the show also has a satirical recurring "advertisment" skit about those who majored in English at college and, though they can correct everyone's grammar, can only get a job at a fast food restaurant--I can identify with that one because I, too, was an English major).

At the beginning of the skit, Ruth tells her teenage employee, Trent, to clean up the library.

"Trent, please take the John Keats death mask down from above the circulation desk and have it dusted before the party tonight."

Trent then asks Ruth why on earth they'd have a party at the library, While I was thinking: "Why on earth would they have John Keats' death mask hanging over the circulation desk??" Now that's one way to keep people *away* from the library. And I can't imagine anyone wanting to be at a party where some dead guy's face is hanging right over you like the grim reaper. I thought it was a funny image and I had to laugh. The irony of it was pretty hillarious and it was a great way to start the sketch.
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Postby Saturn » Sat Jan 28, 2006 11:32 am

I was watching the film 'Quiz Show' the other night and Ketas was mentioned in passing.

The lead character, Charles Van Doren was a professor of literature who goes on a TV show that is rigged in the '50s and becomes intoxicated with the fame and celebrity it brings him.

He returns to his University office and there are many nubile young women vying for his attention and one of them asks him about the meaning of 'Ode On A Grecian Urn'.

Just a spotting in an unlikely place - boy I have to get out more
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Postby Credo Buffa » Fri Feb 03, 2006 5:32 am

I'm a huge Monty Python fan and I'm amazed that I'd never seen this sketch before now: http://orangecow.org/pythonet/sketches/poetant.htm
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Postby Despondence » Fri Feb 03, 2006 6:25 am

OMG! That's hilarious, I hadn't seen that one either.. :D
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Postby Malia » Fri Feb 03, 2006 7:01 am

Credo Buffa,
I remember seeing this one a few years ago (I thought Eric Idol looked remarkably like Keats, hehe). It's strange because in the passing of time, I remembered it as being some kind of game show and that Keats got into a brawl with Shelley before he was kicked out of the gameshow. (Strange what the mind "remembers", I guess!) It's great to be able to read the script, though, and get my facts straight again--though watching someone dressed as Keats beat up someone dressed as Shelley might almost be worth paying for. :wink:
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Postby Credo Buffa » Fri Feb 03, 2006 7:40 am

Malia wrote:It's great to be able to read the script, though, and get my facts straight again--though watching someone dressed as Keats beat up someone dressed as Shelley might almost be worth paying for. :wink:

That's what I love about the Pythons: they know how to make ridiculous fun out of academia! :D
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Postby Saturn » Fri Feb 03, 2006 10:08 am

Credo Buffa wrote:I'm a huge Monty Python fan and I'm amazed that I'd never seen this sketch before now: http://orangecow.org/pythonet/sketches/poetant.htm


Brilliant - Ode To A Glass of Sherry :lol:

I love Python too - but I've never seen this sketch.

There's an episode of the comedy Blackadder in which Coleridge, Byron and Shelley appear [but no Keats] which is similarly bizarre.

See here [you'll have to read down a bit]
http://humour.50megs.com/blackadder/ba32.html
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McKellen as Keats?

Postby Malia » Fri Feb 10, 2006 10:10 pm

Check this out--I found this in a list of the films/t.v. shows that Sir Ian McKellen has done over his long career. Can't *quite* see him as Keats :lol: --but then again, I can't quite "see" him as a young man, either ;)

If you want to see where I found this go to:
www.mckellen.com/video/index

1970 KEATS
PRODUCER: BBC TV
DIRECTOR: Joan Craft
ROLE: John Keats
Poetry compilation. Solo performance of Ian McKellen as John Keats.
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Postby Saturn » Fri Feb 10, 2006 11:02 pm

Not Found
The requested URL /video/index was not found on this server.


The link doesn't appear to work :?

Thanks anyway - I think this has been mentioned before on this forum a few times.

I can actually see Ian Mc Kellan as Keats - I've seen pictures of him when he was a LOT younger and he does bear something of a partial likeness to Keats.
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Postby Despondence » Sat Feb 11, 2006 8:54 pm

Remove "index" from the above (i.e. just www.mckellen.com/video/).
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Postby Saturn » Sat Feb 11, 2006 10:50 pm

Thanks Despondence - like the new avatar - what type of butterfly is that?
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Postby Despondence » Mon Feb 13, 2006 4:05 am

A Monarch, I think. Got tired of watching Endymion mooning over, well, the moon....and at least this is one of my own pictures. Actually, I was inspired by the sig of one of our members, jfk I think, who has a snippet of his poem in his sig containing the phrase "melancholy wing", which made me dig out this old photo.
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Postby Malia » Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:16 pm

I've been studying the Miller's Analogies Test (MAT) for an entrance exam I need to take as part of the application package for a master's degree program and in the preparation book I bought they mention that we'd need to know some literature in order to understand some of the analogies. One author we might need to know is John Keats (they have a picture of him in the prep book) who wrote "Ode TO a Grecian Urn". Hmm. . .

I also found a reference to Keats in a book I just finished called "Shackleton's Way"--a book about leadership. (I highly recommend the book!) Anyway, Earnest Shackleton was an Antarctic explorer in the early 20th c. who famously got stranded with his crew of the Endurance for two years and somehow managed to find civilization and save everyone in his crew after 2 years in the antarctic wilderness.

Toward the end of his jorney--after he and a few of his crew sailed in a lifeboat across the frigid antarctic seas to tiny South Georgia Island where there was whaling village, he and his men had to climb over difficult, unchartered and icy terrain to reach the whaling. At one point, Shakleton was reminded of Keats' comment about the peaceful silence of death--and how he began to long for it like Keats did--but he pulled himself up and was determined to perservere and make it to the village alive (which he and his men eventually did). Kind of a dramatic situation for Keats to pop up in. And I'm sure Keats would have loved Shakleton--who was very much the kind of strong, courageous English hero that Keats worshipped as a kid.
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Postby Saturn » Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:46 pm

Get the excellent drama about Shackleton on DVD 'Shackleton' starring my favourite actor Kenneth Branagh - it's an incredible story.

Believe me, you won't regret it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/sea ... 22-7018264

An Irishman too :D
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Postby Malia » Tue Feb 21, 2006 12:13 am

I've seen that drama, Saturn, and I agree--it is excellent. He plays a really convincing Shackleton.

Saturn wrote:Get the excellent drama about Shackleton on DVD 'Shackleton' starring my favourite actor Kenneth Branagh - it's an incredible story.

Believe me, you won't regret it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/sea ... 22-7018264

An Irishman too :D
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