"To Some Ladies" - Questions

Discussion on the works of John Keats.

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"To Some Ladies" - Questions

Postby carrya » Wed Dec 07, 2011 9:16 pm

http://www.bartleby.com/126/5.html

"What though while the wonders of nature exploring..."

I don't really understand this.

"Nor listen to accents, that almost adoring, / Bless Cynthia’s face, the enthusiast’s friend..."

What exactly does he mean? That he regrets he's not there to hear the ladies speak and listen to them as they praise the moon?
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Re: "To Some Ladies" - Questions

Postby carrya » Wed Feb 29, 2012 6:18 pm

Okay...
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Re: "To Some Ladies" - Questions

Postby Raphael » Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:23 pm

carrya wrote:http://www.bartleby.com/126/5.html

"What though while the wonders of nature exploring..."

I don't really understand this.

"Nor listen to accents, that almost adoring, / Bless Cynthia’s face, the enthusiast’s friend..."

What exactly does he mean? That he regrets he's not there to hear the ladies speak and listen to them as they praise the moon?


Is this for homework?
No- he means that whilst he enjoys and pays attention to aspects of nature-streams, bees, mountains etc that he cannot pay attention to them fully- hence him using the images of their footsteps and talking (accents- which are prettily spoken so can be seen as an offering to Cynthia) as he is seeking inspiration in nature for a poem but they are included in it- he is saying he cannot just walk and do chit chat basically but wants to walk in contemplation and observation - he is looking for visuals for imagery in a poem.

The ladies in question were friends who gave him a gift (I forget what it was).
John....you did not live to see-
who we are because of what you left,
what it is we are in what we make of you.

Peter Sanson, 1995.
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Re: "To Some Ladies" - Questions

Postby carrya » Thu Mar 01, 2012 4:00 pm

Is this for homework?


No, I'm not in school at the moment. I'm reading Keats on my own. For some bizarre reason, I thought this might be a good place to discuss the meaning of his poems. :D

No- he means that whilst he enjoys and pays attention to aspects of nature-streams, bees, mountains etc that he cannot pay attention to them fully- hence him using the images of their footsteps and talking (accents- which are prettily spoken so can be seen as an offering to Cynthia) as he is seeking inspiration in nature for a poem but they are included in it- he is saying he cannot just walk and do chit chat basically but wants to walk in contemplation and observation - he is looking for visuals for imagery in a poem.


Thank you for the explanation. I'm still having trouble with "What though while...". I don't think I've seen those words in that order before. Speaking of meaning, I don't really get these lines from "Endymion:"

"’Mong shepherds gone in eld, whose looks increas’d / The silvery setting of their mortal star."

So... the shepherds are old and have grey hair and are close to death (their "star" is "setting"), but what does it mean that their "looks increase" this? The looks in their eyes and on their face makes them look even older?

The ladies in question were friends who gave him a gift (I forget what it was).


It was a shell (he mentions this later in the poem) and a copy of Thomas Moore's "The Wreath and the Chain."
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