Huzzah!

Discussion of other topics not necessarily Keats or poetry-related, i.e. other authors, literature, film, music, the arts etc.

Moderators: Saturn, Malia

Huzzah!

Postby Malia » Sat Apr 15, 2006 12:05 am

Don't know where would be best to post this but I just got a call from the interlibrary loan desk at the local library (yes, I know very exciting :lol:) and they were able to borrow a copy of Andrew Motion's Omnibus program--the last journey of John Keats--from a library in Seattle! So, I'll be able to watch it this weekend :)

I saw it when it first showed in England back in '95 so it will be fun to watch it again!
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby Saturn » Sat Apr 15, 2006 12:08 am

Lucky you - well done for tracking it down :(

I've never seen it.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3940
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby Credo Buffa » Sat Apr 15, 2006 12:15 am

Yay!

I think I remember that program being in St. Olaf's library collection while I was there, but stupid me. . . I never checked it out! Perhaps next time I go visit I should have one of my friends check it out for me :wink:
"Holy Kleenex, Batman! It was right under our nose and we blew it!"
User avatar
Credo Buffa
Lamia
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 1:42 am
Location: Minnesota

Postby Malia » Sat Apr 15, 2006 5:12 am

Credo Buffa wrote:Yay!

I think I remember that program being in St. Olaf's library collection while I was there, but stupid me. . . I never checked it out! Perhaps next time I go visit I should have one of my friends check it out for me :wink:


Maybe we can each give a review! :lol:
I remember that it was interesting, but Motion didn't reveal any hidden secrets or juicy bits of information. It was Keats 101. Still, it was cool to be able to see what the inside of the Maria Crowther *might* have looked like.
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby dks » Sat Apr 15, 2006 5:39 am

*moan* Motion and his Maria Crowther pilgrimmage...

I'll top that show off yet...I'll go on a walking tour in the highlands...with a neckerchief "up to my eyes!"

:P
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
User avatar
dks
Dante
 
Posts: 1469
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 6:14 am
Location: Texas

Postby Saturn » Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:29 pm

I'd like to see the Historian Michael Wood go on a 'In the Footsteps of Keats' program for the BBC - he has previously done excellent programmes about Alexander the Great and The Conquistadors.

Or even, for a deliciously humourous take on the subject, Michael Palin of Monty Python and 80 Days Around The World fame perhaps :wink:
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3940
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby Credo Buffa » Sat Apr 15, 2006 3:59 pm

Saturn wrote:Or even, for a deliciously humourous take on the subject, Michael Palin of Monty Python and 80 Days Around The World fame perhaps :wink:

YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :D
"Holy Kleenex, Batman! It was right under our nose and we blew it!"
User avatar
Credo Buffa
Lamia
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 1:42 am
Location: Minnesota

Postby Malia » Sat Apr 15, 2006 9:59 pm

Saturn wrote:Or even, for a deliciously humourous take on the subject, Michael Palin of Monty Python and 80 Days Around The World fame perhaps :wink:


I don't see how Keats's last journey to Rome and death could be made into something completely comical--I mean, there were some moments, but above all. . .it was pretty much a torture.

BUT, it would be interesting to see a Palin take on his life in *general*--I'm sure there's a lot of fodder there! And I loved Palin's 80 Days Around the World program a lot. I remember one episode when he was trying to meditate with monks in Nepal and showed how--in order to make sure everyone stayed awake during meditation--a monk would come around with a stick and whack everyone on the shoulders from time to time. Though he said the worse torture was sitting in the same position for 9 hours!

I was able to see the Motion Documentary "The Last Journey of John Keats" this morning and it was pretty much how I remember it. Motion can't read Keats's letters or poetry with *any* feeling--but he employed an actor to do most of the voiceover readings and the actor did a good job, I thought.

There was one point where Motion and the actor sat together onboard the sailing ship that represented the Maria Crowther and tried the trick of taking cayanne pepper and chasing it with a bumper of claret. Needless to say, both their faces turned scarlet and in an understated, half-scholastic way, they discussed how painful their throats felt! Motion said that all the cayanne did was make you want to drink more of the wine (which, he supposed, was the whole point! :lol:). The show is extremely asthetic--really "artsy"--and was mostly made up of abstract images of the sea, sails, rigging and birds and treetops with voiceovers of Keats's letters and poetry and Motion's narration. It was really interesting to see the inside of the boat and get a look at the kind of berth Keats and the others had to sleep in--it looked a *lot* like a coffin.

One "sort of funny" moment came when Motion stopped off in Teignmouth on his way out of England. He recited--from a window in a building with a sign out front saying "Keats House" (maybe the house he stayed in when he was there with Tom?)--Keats's diatribe against Teignmouth as being a wet, soggy, slipshod country--and on and on about how rainy it is there. Well, when Motion filmed the piece, it was bright and sunny without a cloud in the sky. So, the scene starts off with a shot of three firemen pointing their water hoses to the sky so that it would "rain" while Motion read the entry. That was kind of "Python-esque" I thought. :)

The show made me really want to see a longer, more involved documentary OR docu-drama (Masterpiece Theatre style) devoted to Keats. His life was certainly interesting enough to make a show "work".
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby Saturn » Sun Apr 16, 2006 11:07 am

Malia wrote:
Saturn wrote:Or even, for a deliciously humourous take on the subject, Michael Palin of Monty Python and 80 Days Around The World fame perhaps :wink:


I don't see how Keats's last journey to Rome and death could be made into something completely comical--I mean, there were some moments, but above all. . .it was pretty much a torture.

BUT, it would be interesting to see a Palin take on his life in *general*--I'm sure there's a lot of fodder there!


That's what I meant sorry - a take on Keats own life including the Scottish trip with Brown and Isle of Man holidays.

Palin has also done a series in the footsteps of Hemmingway which managed ti combine humour and respect.

There is plenty of humour and poignancy in Keats life - humour even in that last trip to Rome aboard the ship and times like that.

I was not being facetious - I think Palin is a responsible, highly intelligent and respectful broadcaster with a great command of good humour.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3940
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am


Return to Miscellaneous

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests