A Nature walk

Discussion of other topics not necessarily Keats or poetry-related, i.e. other authors, literature, film, music, the arts etc.

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Postby Fortuna » Thu Apr 20, 2006 1:28 am

dks wrote:Your avatar looks quite like you. Bonita!


I'm delighted you think so :).

It's painted by John William Waterhouse, I don't know if all of you are familiar with this work but he's also been inspired by Keats' poetry.
"Call’d him soft names in many a mused rhyme,
To take into the air my quiet breath"
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Postby dks » Thu Apr 20, 2006 4:09 am

Fortuna wrote:
dks wrote:Your avatar looks quite like you. Bonita!


I'm delighted you think so :).

It's painted by John William Waterhouse, I don't know if all of you are familiar with this work but he's also been inspired by Keats' poetry.


Did he also paint a version of Isabella and the Pot of Basil? I love that image...
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
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Postby Saturn » Thu Apr 20, 2006 9:15 am

Thanks for the link Fortuna - I've seen those paintings before but never had a name to put to the artist.

I love all that Pre-raphaelite art :shock:
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Postby Fortuna » Thu Apr 20, 2006 4:11 pm

Saturn wrote:I love all that Pre-raphaelite art :shock:


Oh me too... Pre-Raphaelite art is a real weakness of mine- and do my friends know it! I have countless birthday cards all with Waterhouse's works. I have been lucky enough to see some of those works in galleries up close. I was quite struck by how large they are and it almost feels like the subjects are ready to step right out of the frames. I think I may have even fallen in love with Waterhouse's paintings of Keat's poetry before I discovered his source of inspiration... it's hazy who came first. :)
"Call’d him soft names in many a mused rhyme,
To take into the air my quiet breath"
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Postby dks » Thu Apr 20, 2006 6:53 pm

Fortuna wrote:
Saturn wrote:I love all that Pre-raphaelite art :shock:


Oh me too... Pre-Raphaelite art is a real weakness of mine- and do my friends know it! I have countless birthday cards all with Waterhouse's works. I have been lucky enough to see some of those works in galleries up close. I was quite struck by how large they are and it almost feels like the subjects are ready to step right out of the frames. I think I may have even fallen in love with Waterhouse's paintings of Keat's poetry before I discovered his source of inspiration... it's hazy who came first. :)


Yes...those Pre-Raphaelite painted women--ethereal looking expressions and long, thick locks with warm lighted backgrounds...
I, myself, like Dante Rosetti.
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
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Postby Saturn » Thu Apr 20, 2006 9:36 pm

dks wrote:
Yes...those Pre-Raphaelite painted women--ethereal looking expressions and long, thick locks with warm lighted backgrounds...
I, myself, like Dante Rosetti.


That's the boy.

He was undoubtedly the master of the form...and a not-too shabby poet either :D
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Postby dks » Thu Apr 20, 2006 9:45 pm

Saturn wrote:
He was undoubtedly the master of the form...and a not-too shabby poet either :D



Yes! Check out "A Match with the Moon" and "Autumn Idleness"--
very nice... :wink:
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Postby Malia » Thu Apr 20, 2006 9:54 pm

I think Rosetti's sister was a writer, as well.
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Postby dks » Thu Apr 20, 2006 10:00 pm

Malia wrote:I think Rosetti's sister was a writer, as well.


Christina. Yes, she's great, too. Check out "From the Antique" by her--awesome.

Oh, and Dante Rosetti's best poem is probably "Sudden Light." It's a little tribute to deja vu...for those of us who don't believe in coincidence!! :wink:
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Postby Fortuna » Fri Apr 21, 2006 10:05 am

I discovered Christina Rossetti's work only a week ago myself. Her mother Frances Polidori, was the sister of Lord Byron's physician. And I believe Dante Gabriel Rossetti befriended W.H. Hunt after seeing a painting of his based on Keats' The Eve of St Agnes.
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