Your Favorite Lines from Keats

Discussion on the works of John Keats.

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Your Favorite Lines from Keats

Postby Malia » Tue Jan 24, 2006 12:06 am

Hello everyone :)

What are some of your favorite lines from Keats's poetry? What are some of your favorite lines from his letters?

Just to start the ball rolling, here are a few of my all-time faves:

Favorite in the category of dramatic content:

From Lamia--
On the high couch he lay!
No breath or pulse they found
And in its marriage robe
The heavy body wound

Favorite Line from the Letters:

From a letter written to Fanny Brawne (I think it was written in May, 1820):
"I cannot brook the wolfsbane of fashion, foppery and tattle."

Though I understand that quote from the letter was written in great distress, I love the way the words feel in my mouth as I speak them. They have a great Shakespearian quality.
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Postby Despondence » Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:13 am

I could just copy and paste half of the Letters...qualify in my mind as favorite lines :) But let's start with one:

--I shall never be a Reasoner because I care not to be in the right, when retired from bickering and in a proper philosophical temper.

Letter to Bailey, 13 March 1818. Very philosophical and memorable letter with Keats in rather an audacious state of mind, containing the sonnet "The Human Seasons".
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Postby Saturn » Tue Jan 24, 2006 10:28 am

This is a very difficult question to answer with such a bounty of goodness to choose from but here goes:

My favourite lines of poetry:

“…Poesy alone can tell her dreams,
With the fine spell of words alone can save
Imagination from the sable charm
And dumb enchantment. Who alive can say
‘Thou art no Poet; may’st not tell thy dreams?’
Since every man whose soul is not a clod
Hath visions, and would speak, if he had lov’d
And been well nurtured in his mother tongue.”
‘The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream’ Canto I, 8-15

This expresses perfectly the democratic right of every man or woman to express themselves in poetry, in the teeth of the whole literary establishment who frowned on 'lower class' poets like Keats.

And from the letters:

“A Poet is the most unpoetical of anything in existence; because he has no Identity—he is continually in for—and filling some other Body—The Sun, The Moon, the Sea and Men and Women who are creatures of impulse are poetical and have about them an unchangeable attribute—the poet has none; no identity—he is certainly the most unpoetical of all God’s Creatures."
To R. Woodhouse, 27 Oct 1818.

Not even Shakespeare came as close to this in defining the nature of the poet.

Mind you, ask me in five minutes time and I'll come up with some completely different pieces :mrgreen:
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby Despondence » Wed Jan 25, 2006 6:40 am

Also from The Fall of Hyperion, Canto I:

"Only the dreamer venoms all his days,
Bearing more woe than all his sins deserve."


And the whole preceding paragraph:

"[...] Thou art a dreaming thing,
A fever of thyself. Think of the Earth;
What bliss even in hope is there for thee?
What haven? Every creature hath its home;
Every sole man hath days of joy and pain,
Whether his labours be sublime or low --
The pain alone; the joy alone; distinct;"
Despondence
 

fancy, imagination, realms, and dreams; the poetic spirit..

Postby jamiano » Thu May 04, 2006 5:30 pm

Dear friends,

Hello, to everyone. True happiness exists as a gentle spirit,
to welcome the sensual ambition within desire for a touch of beauty.
I have begun to chart tropic verses of Keat, reflective of the realms
of the imagination. The verse at the bottom from the sonnet, "The Human Seasons", explores a measure of contentment.

I remember, a verse I wrote in my childhood,:"A walk upon the light of the universe." The verse is a fragment from a poem I wrote in grade school. The poetic mind is within all of us. The orgin of
a poem begins at an unknown hour. Perhaps, this unknown element of poetry gifts the imagination with a liberty, to prosper, timeless. I believe a great poem, raptured of a precious moment, is aligned to a distinct passion within humanity. For example, the continual enjoyment obtained from a Keats poem of naturalism, reflects mankind's nobel quest for joy. I have thoughts of poetry , especially of Keats' verses, to advance world peace. Maybe, existing as a poetic dreamer in today's world of conflict, is a harbour of sanity and an inspiration to advance freedom throughout the world.
Beyond the imagination, has no borders.

I enjoy my grade school verse. Do you remember, a personal poetic verse from the past? Keats' sorrow within childhood, along with the trials of adult life, fostered a lofty imagination. I enjoy the naturalism within his verse, a gift to heal time in a void.



"He has his lusty spring, when fancy clear
Takes in all beauty with an easy span:"


The Human Seasons
John Keats



peace,

jamiano
Last edited by jamiano on Fri May 05, 2006 6:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Credo Buffa » Thu May 04, 2006 11:12 pm

Very Wordsworthian, jamiano :)
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Postby greymouse » Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:33 pm

Hi everyone! I'm new here. :oops:

My favorite lines that immediately come to mind are (from Nightingale):

"With beaded bubbles winking at the brim,
And purple-stained mouth"

Nothing serious, but they are a neat example of how evocative Keats is. He is always engaging all of my senses, creating that intoxicating vibe. It seems his poetry is filled with little haiku-like spasms of beauty.

I think that's why he was well respected in both the 20th century and the 19th.
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Postby Saturn » Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:37 pm

Well said - good choices.

And welcome on board - hope you like the forum :D
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby greymouse » Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:45 pm

Thanks Saturn! It's good to be here (I'm wearing a JK t-shirt as I type).
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Postby Malia » Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:05 pm

greymouse wrote:Thanks Saturn! It's good to be here (I'm wearing a JK t-shirt as I type).


There is such a thing?? Wow! :) Welcome to the forum, greymouse!
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Postby Malia » Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:07 pm

greymouse wrote:Hi everyone! I'm new here. :oops:

My favorite lines that immediately come to mind are (from Nightingale):

"With beaded bubbles winking at the brim,
And purple-stained mouth"

Nothing serious, but they are a neat example of how evocative Keats is. He is always engaging all of my senses, creating that intoxicating vibe. It seems his poetry is filled with little haiku-like spasms of beauty.

I think that's why he was well respected in both the 20th century and the 19th.


I've always believed that Keats's works, when read aloud, is like tasting fine chocolate or some amazingly rich dessert (without the calories!!). His words just *feel* exquisite--never mind how amazing they are to the ear and "mind's eye". Keats definitely stimulates all the senses.
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Postby Saturn » Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:23 pm

greymouse wrote:Thanks Saturn! It's good to be here (I'm wearing a JK t-shirt as I type).


What? :shock:

Where can we get such an item?

I'd love to see the looks I would get walking around with a t-shirt with Keats on it :lol:
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
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Postby greymouse » Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:24 pm

Good to meet you Malia!

Malia wrote:There is such a thing?? Wow! Welcome to the forum, greymouse!


Some place in Arizona sells them, but I cannot recommend it because it wrinkles with the least provocation, and that in turn makes me ugly and restless.

It should be cool because it has a small picture of him on front and on back the lines:

"Beauty is truth, truth beauty, that is all
ye know on Earth and all ye need to know"

Saturn, if you are really interested and own an iron and board, I think the place is called Arizona Cap Company?

http://www.arizonacap.com/Gifts/thinkers-31-40.htm is the link right now.
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Postby Saturn » Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:32 pm

I could make my own t-shirt I suppose.

I've got those t-shirt transfers you can iron on.

I'm too sheepish to wear one though - I would get very strange looks indeed :?
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Postby fleshyniteshade » Wed Jun 28, 2006 3:13 pm

"indeed I am almost astonished that any absent one should have that luxurious power over my senses which I feel. Even when I am not thinking of you I receive your influence and a tenderer nature steeling upon me"
"aye, my envious dreams do shyly express thy tenderous lips fairly laced with sensous honey and I like aroused virgins dwell upon such dining"
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