Your Favorite Lines from Keats

Discussion on the works of John Keats.

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Postby dks » Wed Jun 28, 2006 7:43 pm

Yeah. Ok.

T-shirts? I'll need to order in bulk probably--thanks for that delicious tip, greymouse, and welcome!

Saturn, if anyone looks at you strangely it will be because they are "struck dumb" by the erudition you'd exude through intensely unique wardrobe selection--and besides, who the hell cares what they think? All of us here know how great you are... :wink:

Good choice of a quote, fleshynightshade. Beautifully sad, is it not?

I must feverishly recommend that you all read F. Scott Fitzgerald--all of his masterful prose is Keatsian, as Keats was his very favorite poet (Malia knows). "Tender is the Night"--lines taken right from "Nightingale"--but the greatest American Romantic character of all time (and modeled after Keats, I really believe) is the superb Jay Gatsby--such a gorgeous illustration of sensuous romanticism...brilliance abounding, really. :shock:
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
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Postby Saturn » Wed Jun 28, 2006 9:35 pm

The Great Gatsby is in my top five novels :D

The tragedy of a man trying to relive, to recreate his youth. I can strongly relate to him and his romantic sensibilities.
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Postby greymouse » Wed Jun 28, 2006 9:51 pm

Hi dks, it's good to meet you.

Thanks for the novel recommend. Despite my lack of free time, I try to read a few books a year. I'll see if I can't fit the Great Gatsby in sometime before the year is up.
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Postby Saturn » Wed Jun 28, 2006 10:10 pm

It is THE classic American novel - full of the American Dream...it's triumphs and its pitfalls.
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Postby dks » Wed Jun 28, 2006 11:18 pm

Saturn wrote:It is THE classic American novel - full of the American Dream...it's triumphs and its pitfalls.



Oh! Is it not, though? There are some breathtakingly gorgeous passages in that crown jewel of a novel--truly a masterpiece. Scottie Fitzgerald was a poet...through and through--he just happened to also be a consummate storyteller. :shock:

Plus, he was Irish. Yes, indeedy, he was. :wink:
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Postby Saturn » Wed Jun 28, 2006 11:31 pm

Well with a name like that how could he not be? - well second generation I suppose.

We were once a nation full of poets.

In fact back in pre-historic, mythic times the chieftans of Ireland were first and foremost poets.
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Postby Credo Buffa » Thu Jun 29, 2006 1:19 am

Would you all believe that I graduated with a degree in English just over a year ago and didn't read The Great Gatsby until just last summer?








I know. . . shocking. :shock:

But yes, it's a gorgeous novel. And it's really quite a comparatively short one, greymouse, so even while reveling in the prose, it doesn't have to be as big a time commitment as most classic works.

Random, fun bit of trivia: Jay Gatsby went to my alma mater!

"An instinct towards his future glory had led him, some months before, to the small Lutheran College of St. Olaf's in southern Minnesota. He stayed there two weeks, dismayed at its ferocious indifference to the drums of his destiny, to destiny itself, and despising the janitor's work with which he was to pay his way through."

I don't blame him. . . my work-study job my first two years was horrendous! :P :lol:

But back to Keats. I have the Modern Library edition of Keats's poems, and there's a great quote from Fitzgerald on the back that I read almost every time I pick up the book:

"I suppose I've read 'Ode on a Grecian Urn' a hundred times. About the tenth time I began to know what it was about, and caught the chime in it and the exquisite inner mechanics. Likewise with the 'Nightingale,' which I can never read without tears in my eyes; likewise 'Isabella,' with its great stanzas about the two brothers. . . Knowing these things very young and granted an ear, one could scarcely ever afterwards be unable to distinguish between gold and dross in what one read."

Keats could ask for no higher praise than that!
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Postby dks » Thu Jun 29, 2006 1:36 am

greymouse wrote:Hi dks, it's good to meet you.

Thanks for the novel recommend. Despite my lack of free time, I try to read a few books a year. I'll see if I can't fit the Great Gatsby in sometime before the year is up.


Nice to meet you, as well. :wink:
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Postby dks » Thu Jun 29, 2006 1:38 am

Credo Buffa wrote:Would you all believe that I graduated with a degree in English just over a year ago and didn't read The Great Gatsby until just last summer?








I know. . . shocking. :shock:

But yes, it's a gorgeous novel. And it's really quite a comparatively short one, greymouse, so even while reveling in the prose, it doesn't have to be as big a time commitment as most classic works.

Random, fun bit of trivia: Jay Gatsby went to my alma mater!

"An instinct towards his future glory had led him, some months before, to the small Lutheran College of St. Olaf's in southern Minnesota. He stayed there two weeks, dismayed at its ferocious indifference to the drums of his destiny, to destiny itself, and despising the janitor's work with which he was to pay his way through."

I don't blame him. . . my work-study job my first two years was horrendous! :P :lol:

But back to Keats. I have the Modern Library edition of Keats's poems, and there's a great quote from Fitzgerald on the back that I read almost every time I pick up the book:

"I suppose I've read 'Ode on a Grecian Urn' a hundred times. About the tenth time I began to know what it was about, and caught the chime in it and the exquisite inner mechanics. Likewise with the 'Nightingale,' which I can never read without tears in my eyes; likewise 'Isabella,' with its great stanzas about the two brothers. . . Knowing these things very young and granted an ear, one could scarcely ever afterwards be unable to distinguish between gold and dross in what one read."

Keats could ask for no higher praise than that!


Ahhh, yes!! Thank you, to the lovely Credo for the superbly gorgeous quote from Scottie--he is, after all, the novelist equivalent to our man. Of this, I am certain. :shock:
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Postby dks » Thu Jun 29, 2006 1:39 am

Saturn wrote:Well with a name like that how could he not be? - well second generation I suppose.

We were once a nation full of poets.

In fact back in pre-historic, mythic times the chieftans of Ireland were first and foremost poets.


Yes. That's history to be proud of...it's in your very veins...
:shock:
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Postby dks » Thu Jun 29, 2006 1:40 am

Yes...Scottie Fitzgerald--an American Irishman, at that!! :wink:
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Postby Credo Buffa » Thu Jun 29, 2006 1:47 am

And a born Midwesterner!

Yeah, baby. 8)
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Postby dks » Thu Jun 29, 2006 1:53 am

Credo Buffa wrote:And a born Midwesterner!

Yeah, baby. 8)


Oh-ain't that the truth? He was so sensitive and had a chiseled, handsome look about him-you all know he was a relative of Frances Scott Key, right? Hence, the name? The guy who wrote our "Star Spangled Banner?"

In fact, in one of his short stories, he gives the surname "Key" to a lesser character...interesting, eh?

How 'bout them apples? :wink:
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Postby dks » Thu Jun 29, 2006 1:55 am

Credo! You went to St. Olaf?! Soo incredibly cool.

Ok-the sweet red wine is going to my head already---I'll stop posting consecutively now...

it's just you guys are some of the best people in the world--truly.

have I mentioned how much I love this forum?

ok. Stop, Denise.

:shock: :lol:
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Postby Credo Buffa » Thu Jun 29, 2006 5:33 am

dks wrote:Credo! You went to St. Olaf?! Soo incredibly cool.

Indeed I did. I am officially your quintessential upper Midwestern girl: tall, hearty, blonde haired/blue eyed, primarily Germanic/Scandinavian descent, Lutheran, last name ending in -son, from a family of farmers (not my immediate family, but a good portion of the rest of my family!), graduate of Minnesota college founded by Norwegian Lutherans. :lol:

One of the things I love most about F. Scott Fitzgerald is that he's so like most young Midwestern people anxious to get out in the world, because so many people just getting out of high school or college have a distinct feeling that Minnesota/Wisconsin/Iowa/North and South Dakota/etc. aren't the "world" like New York/California/etc. are, so they make plans to "get out as fast as they can." I find it almost comforting to know that this has been the case ever since Jazz Age America. :wink:

What's more is that even after his "escape" from Minnesota, Fitzgerald is still so positively influenced by the Midwest. So we may be stuck in a time warp (or however you want to say it), but we're real and honest and comfortable and "like home" in a way that so many of these other more "exciting" places aren't. It's sort of one of those things that a lot of people don't realize until they've left (like Fitzgerald himself), and then the disillusionment just starts to take over. . .

Well, that had nothing to do with Keats quotes! :lol:
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