Mrs. Reynold's Cat question

BEFORE you post a request for help concerning study assignments or research papers here , PLEASE check with the SEARCH ENGINE above to see if there's already a thread on the subject.

Moderators: Saturn, Malia

Mrs. Reynold's Cat question

Postby dennis » Mon May 15, 2006 2:50 pm

At the end of the poem, what does Keats mean by "glass-bottled wall"?

Thanks in advance for everybody's interpretation.
dennis
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon May 15, 2006 2:46 pm

Re: Mrs. Reynold's Cat question

Postby dks » Mon May 15, 2006 4:47 pm

dennis wrote:At the end of the poem, what does Keats mean by "glass-bottled wall"?

Thanks in advance for everybody's interpretation.


Great question, Dennis! This sonnet is one of my favorites--The last line, I believe, is referring to the cat (in his youth, as a kitten) crawling everywhere and looking like a "list" or a band or stripe of color scaling a "glass-bottled wall"--maybe a wine rack or wine cellar wall...I think it's Keats's way of adding that signature bit o' detail he always does to help catapult his tone, meaning and theme... :wink:

Just an educated guess... :?:
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
User avatar
dks
Dante
 
Posts: 1469
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 6:14 am
Location: Texas

Postby Malia » Mon May 15, 2006 6:00 pm

I actually know what the "glass bottled wall" reference is about. Back in Keats's day, women used to crush up glass bottles/containers and place the shards on top of their garden walls to keep the cats out of the yard. I love it when day-to-day life is captured in literature in this way.

When Keats talks about the cat entering the "lists"--I think it might mean the "lists" of the initiated--i.e. when the cat matured from kitten-hood and started to prowl, maneuvering over the glass-bottled walls.
Stay Awake!
--Anthony deMello
User avatar
Malia
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 1606
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:55 am
Location: Washington State, USA

Postby dennis » Tue May 16, 2006 7:36 am

Ok, thanks alot. I'm really new to poetry and somebody suggested to give Keats a try. I really liked the cat poem because it was "easy" to know what he's talking about....all the way up to that last line (lol). Anyway, now I won't lose anymore sleep over this :)

thanks again
dennis
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon May 15, 2006 2:46 pm

Postby dks » Wed May 17, 2006 4:47 am

Dennis,

I do hope you continue to read Keats's other works--he is THE Romantic genius and I am certain you will become mesmerized by his extraordinary poetry as we all are. :wink:
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
User avatar
dks
Dante
 
Posts: 1469
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 6:14 am
Location: Texas

Postby Credo Buffa » Wed May 17, 2006 5:43 am

Very interesting tidbit, Malia!
"Holy Kleenex, Batman! It was right under our nose and we blew it!"
User avatar
Credo Buffa
Lamia
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 1:42 am
Location: Minnesota

Postby AhDistinctly » Thu Sep 07, 2006 10:02 pm

I was just listening to this poem today, so naturally I needed to see what you all had to say about it!

In my 1899 Complete Poetical Works and Letters of John Keats (Horace Scudder, ed) the poem is simply called "To a Cat." However, every other reference I see lists it as "Mrs. Reynolds' Cat."

I wonder -- is there an authority file of the accepted names for poems, or is it up to the editor to come up with something for an untitled work?

:?: :?: :?:
...perched and sat and nothing more...
User avatar
AhDistinctly
 
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Aug 17, 2006 10:39 pm
Location: Upper Midwest, USA

Postby Saturn » Thu Sep 07, 2006 10:09 pm

AhDistinctly wrote:
I wonder -- is there an authority file of the accepted names for poems, or is it up to the editor to come up with something for an untitled work?

:?: :?: :?:


Ones that were published and overseen by Keats have his own titles.

This poem like many others were unpublished I think and was given a title by its earliest editor I suppose.
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby AhDistinctly » Fri Sep 08, 2006 9:23 pm

A final tidbit from my above-referenced book:

Horace E. Scudder wrote:These verses were addressed by Keats to a cat belonging to Mrs. Reynolds of Little Britain, the mother of his friend John Hamilton Reynolds. Mrs. Reynolds gave the verses to her son-in-law, Tom Hood, who published them in his Comic Annual for 1830.
...perched and sat and nothing more...
User avatar
AhDistinctly
 
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Aug 17, 2006 10:39 pm
Location: Upper Midwest, USA

Postby Saturn » Fri Sep 08, 2006 9:33 pm

:oops:
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am

Postby AhDistinctly » Fri Sep 08, 2006 10:41 pm

Saturn wrote::oops:


Actually, I thought that the Scudder quote backed up your statement!

Either way, I think there is a moral to this: Poets! Title your works -- or someone else will do it for you.
...perched and sat and nothing more...
User avatar
AhDistinctly
 
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Aug 17, 2006 10:39 pm
Location: Upper Midwest, USA

Postby Saturn » Fri Sep 08, 2006 10:55 pm

AhDistinctly wrote:
Either way, I think there is a moral to this: Poets! Title your works -- or someone else will do it for you.


Yes good point :lol:
"Oh what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints".
Saturn
Forum Administrator
 
Posts: 3939
Joined: Mon Apr 12, 2004 10:16 am


Return to Help and Homework

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

cron