What Music Do You Associate With Keats?

Discussion on the works of John Keats.

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Postby greymouse » Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:15 pm

The Goldberg variations get me too. There is a sophistication, a preciseness yet a simple beauty about them which just affects me in ways I can't explain.


There is, I like the Glenn Gould recordings. I remember how spellbound I was within the first few notes of the air, the first time I heard it. I don't care if he plays weird, it's worth it for all the emotion and passion he injects into his music. I'm one of those people who thinks Gould just dominates Bach keyboard playing; I've listened to his performances alongside other interpreters and it doesn't even seem close.

You're right Saturn, baroque music can be a bit sad even when it's happy.
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Postby Saturn » Thu Jul 13, 2006 9:40 pm

All beautiful music can make me cry.

I probably shouldn't say that but it's true.

People wil be doubting my masculinity but I don't care what people think.

I can be as macho as any guy one minute, but soft as a kitten the next.

There should be no conflict there.

I'm completely in touch with my feelings and emotions and not ashamed to say so. :wink:
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Postby MonroeDoctrine » Tue Sep 26, 2006 3:23 am

I must say that I'm glad you folks listen to classical music. I recommend Mozart's K.421 and the Dissonance Quartet.

Just as good as a Keats poem!
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Postby Richard » Thu Oct 19, 2006 7:30 pm

I think his own music, those unheard are nicer still

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Postby Richard » Thu Oct 19, 2006 7:50 pm

Sorry slightly flippant here. Still
Often when I hear the turgid hackneyed doggerel that masquerades as 'lyrics' I want to vomit all my vowels.
What about a nice bit of Thos Hardy accompanied by a weak acoustic guitar. Castle Boterill could be the next Stairway to Heaven.
I have the not especially pleasant experience of owning a Divine Comedy CD featuring Lucy, words by that brother with the extra bit willy Wordsworth (they are so beautiful, you don't even need a daughter, and you sure don't need Divine Comedy, but those unheard.....bang on. Nailed it again John)

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Postby dks » Thu Oct 19, 2006 8:57 pm

Richard, all of your inside references make me feel like a child with no change outside a sweet shop window. I can go in, but I can't get anything--so why bother?

I feel so inadequately informed when I read your enthralling posts--I like the way you wield your words...so I'll read on through an aesthetic lens, I suppose. :shock:

I just wanted to say that...it's pointless, really.
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Postby Richard » Mon Oct 23, 2006 10:53 am

Denise. Sorry I don't mean to be vague. 'Inside references' I feel on the outside, I thought you were inside. :o
Could you define 'informed'. If I don't make sense, tell me, all we want is feedback. I will print off Boulevard and see what Black Puss makes of it. It seems to show less Plathesque vulnerability than before, but is still so personal that I feel I shouldn't be reading it.
As you may guess I failed my English Lang exam, it was more like torturers than teachers then, but they failed too, I continue to grow to love poetry more and more. If I had you as my teacher, with your geological erudition, diamond tipped with passion, wow, your pupils don't know how lucky they are, and your boys; read to them.

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Postby Saturn » Mon Oct 23, 2006 12:04 pm

You failed your English Language Richard? :shock:

That's a travesty - never have I read more poetic prose than what you've written here.

Forget it, continue to grow to love poetry and all will be well.
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Re: What Music Do You Associate With Keats?

Postby zebluepenguin » Fri Mar 13, 2009 5:59 am

Poetry and music. You can't go anywhere without music. Music is the language of all men. :D I love Mozart, Bach and Beethoven, but Chopin most of all. :D :D :D :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: 8) 8) 8)
" Heard melodies are sweet. But those unheard are sweeter." -Keats
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Re: What Music Do You Associate With Keats?

Postby Credo Buffa » Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:43 pm

zebluepenguin wrote:Music is the language of all men.


Ooooo. . . be careful saying stuff like that when you've got a closet ethnomusicologist in your midst. :P

I do so wish that Keats could have lived to be introduced to Chopin's music, though. I think they'd get on swimmingly.
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Re: What Music Do You Associate With Keats?

Postby zebluepenguin » Sat Mar 14, 2009 1:48 am

Credo Buffa wrote:Ooooo. . . be careful saying stuff like that when you've got a closet ethnomusicologist in your midst. :P



What's that? Do you mean a person who hates music? I never knew one. :?: hmmn...It must be that I am usually surrounded by music that they are forced to go away... :D I'm glad I never knew one.

And yeah, they'll get along fantastically well, since Chopin knew a bit off poetry as well. Too bad Keats died just a few years before Chopin became famous. :(
" Heard melodies are sweet. But those unheard are sweeter." -Keats
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Re: What Music Do You Associate With Keats?

Postby Credo Buffa » Sat Mar 14, 2009 6:27 pm

zebluepenguin wrote:What's that? Do you mean a person who hates music?

Oh, certainly not! Quite the opposite. Ethnomusicologists are so immersed in music that they study its social and cultural implications around the world. I only said that because the entire concept of music as a "universal language" is quite a hot topic in the field, and any time I see any kind of statement that suggests it, I get a little nervous tic in my eyelid. :wink:
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Re: What Music Do You Associate With Keats?

Postby zebluepenguin » Mon Mar 16, 2009 3:09 am

ooooooooooooooooooooo...........................
" Heard melodies are sweet. But those unheard are sweeter." -Keats
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Re: What Music Do You Associate With Keats?

Postby BrokenLyre » Wed Mar 18, 2009 3:02 am

Credo Buffa wrote:
zebluepenguin wrote:What's that? Do you mean a person who hates music?

Oh, certainly not! Quite the opposite. Ethnomusicologists are so immersed in music that they study its social and cultural implications around the world. I only said that because the entire concept of music as a "universal language" is quite a hot topic in the field, and any time I see any kind of statement that suggests it, I get a little nervous tic in my eyelid. :wink:


Wow - what a great question. John Minahan's book is called "Word like a Bell: John Keats, Music and the Romantic Poet" written in 1992. I am no music scholar, so I don't know exactly how to take this book, but I find it quite interesting and refreshing to see Keats through the musical influences of his day. Any of you ever read it?

Anyway, I don't have an answer to the question "What music do I associate with Keats?" But I like thinking about it. Hmmmmm... How about Samuel Barber's "Adagio for Strings"? The structured movement, the circular rhythmic sense, strong build toward climax with a sensitive, soft feel. I don't know but this comes to mind.... it reminds me of To Autumn in its cycles and movement or parts of Hyperion. Just a sense I get.
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Re: What Music Do You Associate With Keats?

Postby Credo Buffa » Wed Mar 18, 2009 7:12 pm

BrokenLyre wrote:Wow - what a great question. John Minahan's book is called "Word like a Bell: John Keats, Music and the Romantic Poet" written in 1992. I am no music scholar, so I don't know exactly how to take this book, but I find it quite interesting and refreshing to see Keats through the musical influences of his day. Any of you ever read it?

Oh wow, I haven't heard of this book, but I definitely have to go find it now! Talk about two of my favorite things on the planet in the same place at once! :D

*flails*
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