English IV quiz--and my students complained

Discussion of other topics not necessarily Keats or poetry-related, i.e. other authors, literature, film, music, the arts etc.

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Postby Malia » Mon Sep 25, 2006 8:59 pm

That's a cool idea, AhDistinctly! It would be awesome to have a section containing lectures or perhaps some essays about Keats and/or Romantic poetry and/or poetry in general :)
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Postby dks » Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:04 am

AhDistinctly wrote: :idea: Have you ever considered putting a little "elements of poetry" lecture up on this site, Denise? Seriously -- a podcast or something? Or, if you fear the camera's unforgiving eye (although you have no right to, as far as I can see!), a narrated PowerPoint?


Hmmm. I'd love to. How do I go about such a highly technical endeavor, AD?
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Postby dks » Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:05 am

Malia wrote:That's a cool idea, AhDistinctly! It would be awesome to have a section containing lectures or perhaps some essays about Keats and/or Romantic poetry and/or poetry in general :)


Yes, I thought about videotaping some of my classroom lectures...but my students would have a field day just horsing around with the camera--oh well, that may be part of the fun, I suppose. :lol:

I could prop it up somewhere in my classroom...

I fear you all would fall asleep to my lectures... :oops:
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Postby cadbury princess » Tue Sep 26, 2006 9:13 am

Saturn wrote:The thing about me is I have no analytical facilities.

I can read and understand something but the technicalities, the science of literature, is a foreign language to me.

I know nothing of feet, metre, sonnet forms or rhyme schemes etc.

I know what I like and why I like it that's all.

I am a very poor scholar.


Hahaha - well as I'm doing an Eng Lit degree .. I'm sure together we could ace this exam :wink: .. you are probably better at "reading" a poem better than myself anyway ..
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Postby Saturn » Tue Sep 26, 2006 9:27 am

Nah I've just read a lot of stuff - most of it goes over my head :oops:
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Postby AhDistinctly » Tue Sep 26, 2006 4:35 pm

dks wrote:Yes, I thought about videotaping some of my classroom lectures...but my students would have a field day just horsing around with the camera--oh well, that may be part of the fun, I suppose. :lol:
I could prop it up somewhere in my classroom...

You probably couldn 't have students IN the video, as there are legal issues. I did some video for a public service announcement once. It involved taping scenes in a library. We asked people beforehand if they were willing to be taped, and if they were, we had them sign a simple release form. If you can't see the faces, however, I don't think you have to worry about that.

I've never put audio or video on the web. Any experts on our forum? (Actually, I'll bet you have an expert or two among your students!)

dks wrote:I fear you all would fall asleep to my lectures...

Not likely. And definitely not if we had to take one of your tests afterward! :shock:
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Postby dks » Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:34 pm

I wouldn't do that (my tests) to you guys! :wink: Unless you wish to take them...

I know videotaping is too precarious and there's too much red tape and all with release forms and whatnot--I'll relay lessons to you guys somehow, if I think you may be remotely interested :lol: --I'm completely feverish about teaching Keats in the Spring, I cannot wait--and the other British Romantics. :shock: We are doing the poetry research paper now--then it's on to High Middle Ages with Chaucer--then MacBeth before Christmas and Hamlet afterwards, respectively. Then we get to the Romantics, then the Victorian novel--Frankenstein, then 20th Century--probably Lord of the Rings--Fellowship of the Ring. It will be arduous, but I'm looking forward to teaching all of this...

I'll definitely get pics up of my Keats billboard in my classroom--I worked hard on it. :oops:
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Postby dks » Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:58 pm

Saturn wrote:Nah I've just read a lot of stuff - most of it goes over my head :oops:


Rubbish. :?

I can almost tell you exactly what mood or state of mind Saturn is in by looking at his quotes. He's quite literary. All you lady English majors out there can swoon now. :lol:

Stephen, you obviously have high command of comprehension with regard to what you read.
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Postby Malia » Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:23 pm

DKS, I've taken up the challenge and I hereby submit my answers to your most fabulous quiz! :)

On the Grasshopper and Cricket

The poetry of earth is never dead:
When all the birds are faint with the hot sun,
And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run
From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead;
That is the Grasshopper's--he takes the lead
In summer luxury,--he has never done
With his delights; for when tired out with fun
He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed.
The poetry of earth is ceasing never:
On a lone winter evening, when the frost
Has wrought a silence, from the stove there shrills
The Cricket's song, in warmth increasing ever,
And seems to one in drowsiness half lost,
The Grasshopper's among some grassy hills.

John Keats


Poetry Elements Quiz
Shelkey
“On the Grasshopper and the Cricket” by John Keats

1. How does the title add to the meaning?

The title gives us some information about the subjects of the poem—our “main players”. The word “on” implies that this is a meditation about the Grasshopper and the Cricket and how they are linked in some way.


2. Name the senses to which this poem appeals.

Certainly the sense of hearing plays a large part in the poem. The poet connects to the two insects by first *listening* to them.

The sense of smell is also implied—especially when Keats mentions the “new-mown mead”—I can almost smell the sweetness of the field under the summer sun.

There is an implied sense of heat and coolness (sense of touch?) as Keats mentions the hot sun, and the cooling trees and the frost. He implies temperature when he mentions the stove and associates the warmth of the cricket’s song with it.


3. Is there a plot? If so, what type?
I wouldn’t say there is a plot in the traditional sense of the word. . .but he does have a theme: “The poetry of the earth is never dead”—nature’s poetry exists all year round and we can partake of it through our imaginations. (Well, that’s what I got out of it at least.) If the Grasshopper were having an affair with the cricket or if the cricket killed the grasshopper to get singing rights, that might constitute a plot ;) OK, terrible joke just there! :lol:


4. How many feet are in each line?
There are 10 feet in each line.


5. What kind of meter is present?

Keats utilizes iambic pentameter in this sonnet.


6. What kind of repetition is present?
I’m not sure, but I think this is where I should have written abba abba cde cde, right? ;)


7. Does this poem rhyme? If so, is it end or internal rhyme?

This poem rhymes. It contains both end rhymes and at least one internal rhyme. Examples of end rhymes include: run/sun, mead/lead and done/fun. An example of internal rhyme is among/some found in the penultimate line (that is a slant rhyme, but it is internal, too!  ). Keats is well-known for his use of assonance and consonance, too, and instances of these can be found throughout the poem. (Frankly, I think it is his use of assonance and consonance that makes his poems *sound* rich and gives his words that delicious “mouth-feel” when reading his works aloud.) Examples include: summer luxury (repetition of the “u” sound—an example of assonance), the line: “he rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed” gives examples of both. The repetition of the “e” sound (assonance) and the repetition of the “s” sound (consonance).


8. This is a sonnet, so what kind of form is this poem?

This poem is written in the Petrarchian sonnet style (abba abba cdecde) utilizing iambic pentameter.


9. What mental picture do you conjure after reading this poem?
Honestly, I get the picture of our man Keats sitting at his desk or in front of the fire on a cold winter’s night writing this poem and finding hope and comfort in the cricket’s song—a hope that summer will come again and the delight he has in knowing that, through poetry and his imagination, he can connect with the summer and all its delights even in the dead of winter. Though, historically speaking, didn’t he write this at Leigh Hunt’s for some kind of poetry contest? ;) (I’ll have to consult my biographies! :lol: )

Cool test, dks. I like the balance between technical questions and the more subjective questions. I’ll admit, I looked up a few things on the internet (sonnet forms—don’t have those memorized). Great to brush up on my facts, though—and as your kids completed the test “open book” I figured I could complete it “open internet”  Can’t wait for the next quiz!
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Postby dks » Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:40 pm

Miss Malia gets an A--spot on!!

The type of repetition is "incremental repetition" and the form is abstract form.

You nailed the feet and meter perfectly. The plot is actually called a "digression plot." But remember I gave them notes via the Powerpoint--Malia didn't take my notes and she still aced it!!
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Postby Malia » Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:45 pm

dks wrote:Miss Malia gets an A--spot on!!

The type of repetition is "incremental repetition" and the form is abstract form.

You nailed the feet and meter perfectly. The plot is actually called a "digression plot." But remember I gave them notes via the Powerpoint--Malia didn't take my notes and she still aced it!!


Mahalo a nui loa, e dks! :) Now, if only my professor in the master's program will be as kind as you are when grading my paper! :lol:

For my edification, can you explain incremental repetition and digression plot? I'd love to learn more.
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Postby dks » Tue Sep 26, 2006 9:08 pm

Absolutely, Miss Malia. Forgive my typo in my last post--it's not digression, but progression plot. Sorry--long day. :?

Image Progression Plot is when the poem moves slowly like approaching a scene: seen, then heard, then smelled, then tasted, then touched. For instance, To Autumn--the first stanza is full of taste imagery, the second is centered on sight, the third on sound or auditory images.

Incremental repetition is when lines are repeated that are changed slightly each time adding to the meaning as the poem unfolds. For instance, "The poetry of the earth is never dead." and, again "The poetry of earth is ceasing never..."

The Powerpoint is pretty good--quite lengthy, but chock full of great, technical information on poetry. My students took notes, but the quiz just blindsighted many of them--I keep telling them to enjoy the hand holding now, because in less than a year when they go to college, they will need to prepare for some "educational autonomy" as I like to call it--take responsibility for their learning--take great notes and be resourceful. They need to start doing more integrative work--and they thought I would give them some witless, multiple choice quiz! 8)
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Postby AhDistinctly » Tue Sep 26, 2006 10:44 pm

:shock:
Ummm. Teacher? I'd like to move to the seat next to Malia.

Malia -- please move your arm. You are covering up part of your answer!
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Postby Saturn » Tue Sep 26, 2006 10:46 pm

AhDistinctly wrote::shock:
Ummm. Teacher? I'd like to move to the seat next to Malia.

Malia -- please move your arm. You are covering up part of your answer!


:lol: :lol:

That's what I was thinking - can I copy your homework Malia? :shock:
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Postby AhDistinctly » Tue Sep 26, 2006 10:52 pm

dks wrote:Miss Malia gets an A--spot on!!

The type of repetition is "incremental repetition" and the form is abstract form.

You nailed the feet and meter perfectly. The plot is actually called a "digression plot." But remember I gave them notes via the Powerpoint--Malia didn't take my notes and she still aced it!!

My head is spinning from terminology overload. :mrgreen:

Must -- see -- PowerPoint!

PowerPoints are easy to format for the web. You just save as Single File Web Page. As a teacher do you get any server space to which you can save documents for external use?
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