Hello everyone

Discussion on the works of John Keats.

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Hello everyone

Postby Anthony Furze » Tue Jan 23, 2007 1:40 am

Hello everyone.

I was delighted to find I d been given an opportunity to teach Keats to my 10th class students (15 year olds and non native speakers)

The course includes his odes, the opening lines of Endymion, La Belle Dams Sans Merci, Bright Star...and maybe some others.

I was even more delighted to find this forum dedicated to Keats.

What ,in your opinion, are the main qualities I should convey to the students?

Is it important to emphasize his life?
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;)

Postby edwardkeenaghan » Tue Jan 23, 2007 1:52 am

Hey Anthony,His life is his poetry.

To first truly understand his poetry,you need to know the man himself,how he feels and what he writes for.

How love and poetry is his religion and how he loves love.
When i started reading his poetry,i was "breathless"the only poet who has really got under my skin and into my heart.Then by learning more about his life,you see sights never seen and feel feelings never felt.

His poetry is dynamic,and never stops moving,never gets old and never will die.

:wink:
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Postby Papillon » Tue Jan 23, 2007 1:58 am

When I taught Keats, we focused on:

1. The beautiful forms of his poetry and his impeccable ability to follow the structures of the different poetic forms.

2. The allusions to other literature (especially Greek mythology).

3. How his views of the world, nature, love, etc. influenced his poetry.

If you're going to teach his odes, it's interesting to teach them in chronological order and see his growth as a person and a poet.

If you're going to teach his sonnets, it's interesting to teach the students the difference between a Shakespearean and Petrarchan sonnet and how these different forms allow for different transitions.

Also, his poetry makes for a GREAT study of diction, which I think would be even more appropriate for 2nd language learners.

My students also especially enjoyed learning how to color-mark. Keats' poetry is so full of vivid imagery, it's easy for students to find and discuss.

Good luck! :)
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Postby Malia » Tue Jan 23, 2007 3:32 am

Papillon wrote:When I taught Keats, we focused on:

1. The beautiful forms of his poetry and his impeccable ability to follow the structures of the different poetic forms.

2. The allusions to other literature (especially Greek mythology).

3. How his views of the world, nature, love, etc. influenced his poetry.

If you're going to teach his odes, it's interesting to teach them in chronological order and see his growth as a person and a poet.

If you're going to teach his sonnets, it's interesting to teach the students the difference between a Shakespearean and Petrarchan sonnet and how these different forms allow for different transitions.

Also, his poetry makes for a GREAT study of diction, which I think would be even more appropriate for 2nd language learners.

My students also especially enjoyed learning how to color-mark. Keats' poetry is so full of vivid imagery, it's easy for students to find and discuss.

Good luck! :)


Great thoughts, Papillon! I especially agree with Keats being a great study of diction. I like to tell people that Keats's words are "delicious"--because, well, they just have a fabulous mouth-feel when spoken aloud. His use of assonance and consonance is outstanding and absolutely contributes to that mouth-feel. He really went to work to create intricate inner-rhyme schemes within Hyperion. Walter Jackson Bate covers this very well within his biography of Keats and even diagrams part of the poem to show you exactly what Keats is doing. It's amazing because when one reads the poetry, one senses how *right* it sounds without necessarily noticing the real work Keats puts into creating his rhymes and other word choices.
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Postby dks » Tue Jan 23, 2007 3:55 am

"O Hear!"

I'll be teaching my man in the coming weeks, as well--to my high school seniors...I'm getting boxes of Kleenex ready for when we read Nightingale out loud... :oops:
"I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of Imagination."
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Postby Anthony Furze » Tue Jan 23, 2007 5:35 pm

Thanks for all the enthusiastic support!

I started with La Belle Dame and the students were absolutely spellbound. A few nodded their heads after hearing the poem.It was delicious.

I ve started a tuition with a select few students just to test out some ideas.
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Re: Hello everyone

Postby DanielEdwards » Tue Jan 13, 2009 12:55 pm

I have read La Belle Dame and i really liked it very much.
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